A Lesson in Twitter from Nike and Tiger Woods

At approximately 2:27 p.m. EST, on Sunday, April 14, Twitter erupted.

At that exact moment, Tiger Woods sank a two-foot putt, winning the 2019 Masters and successfully completing one of the sports world’s most remarkable comebacks.

Just minutes later, Nike dropped a 52-second video on its social media channels starring the golfer. In a matter of moments, the video was viral – garnering more than 26 million views on Twitter and another 13 million on Instagram. Three times as many people as Nike has total followers viewed, shared, and commented on the posts.

Nike’s tweet wasn’t all that special, when you think about it. It was just a quick video, a short caption, and a hashtag. The video even lacked a narrator, it was just a collection of clips from Tiger’s past and a pretty standard music bed. Nowhere in the tweet did Nike even congratulate the golfer.

The words that flashed across the screen along with the video’s images simply read:

It’s crazy to think a 43-year-old, who has experienced every high and every low and has just won his 15th major is chasing the same dream as a 3-year-old. Just do it.

-Nike

It’s exactly that script and what the tweet didn’t say that made it so viral.

Undoubtedly, Tiger Woods is one of the most accomplished athletes in the world. His success on the links is internationally recognized, and the failures in his personal life have become just as public. He has played both the hero and the villain of his own story. People love to love him, and people love to hate him. And people really, really love to talk about him.

Once Tiger made that putt, millions of tweets – recognizing everything from his incredible comeback win to those above-mentioned personal shortcomings – were shared. Nike took full advantage of that. Their tweet simply contributed to the conversation. It was a conversation that they didn’t start themselves, so they didn’t try to control its narrative. Nike’s content was specific to Tiger Woods and incredibly relevant in the moment, yet just broad enough that people were able to take the content and make it their own.

People quoted and shared Nike’s tweet as they added their own opinions and gave their unique takes on the situation. As they continued to contribute to that global conversation, Nike’s tweet earned more and more impressions and its video collected millions of views.

Nike is a global brand, so it’s sometimes easy to assume that each piece of its marketing strategy is supported by millions of dollars worth of research and creative. That’s probably true. But, at its core, Nike’s very simple and very viral tweet can still serve as a lesson for all marketers, regardless of the size of our businesses, our budgets, or our clients.

Here are some common themes of a successful tweet that we can all take away:

  • Interact with your followers and attract new fans by participating in the global conversation
  • Increase engagement by sharing original, highly relevant content
  • Make that content more shareable by limiting how “salesy” it is
  • Don’t try to control the narrative, join a conversation and let your fans, your content, and your do the work

Nike did all of the above. Its homage to Tiger wasn’t just a congratulatory nod. It was a well-timed, calculated yet simple, extremely successful social media marketing effort – one that deserves just as much recognition as Tiger’s historic victory.

Snarketing: April 2019

One of these things is not like the other

Every time there’s a new social media feature, a Snapchat ghost gets its wings. This month, Instagram launched a multiple choice quiz option for stories, LinkedIn added “reactions” to its timeline posts, and Snapchat updated its Android app altogether.

In the meantime, Facebook’s blog reads more like a list of recommendations from the House Oversight Committee: Safeguarding Elections in Australia and Teaming Up Against False Newssounds like they’re more worried about their reputation than their users.

I know I know… you’re going to mention that Facebook owns Instagram. But even though the company is the same, the brands are very different. Facebook may be able to copy the most popular IG features anytime, but it’s a lot more difficult to borrow good will. Guess they’ll have to keep hunting.

Carbonation Transformation

MillerCoors is taking a stab at a new marketing campaign by integrating its products into original Hulu programming. Product placement is not a new technique, but it’s a gamble on behalf of all beer advertisers that Adweek says is Hulu’s “most expansive integration ever.”

On the softer side of carbonated beverages, Coca-Cola just bought its way into the coffee business. It’s unclear whether they are just trying to get into a new market or they need more caffeine in their portfolio, but I’m sure investors’ blood pressure is going up either way.

In a world where kombucha beverages and flavored sparkling water are taking up more shelf space, these moves seem a little desperate. But at the end of the day, nothing is more American than drinking Coca-Cola, coffee, and Miller Lite.

‘Merica!

Becoming My Own Web Design Client

You’re reading this on the latest version of the Creagent Marketing website, which means we’ve gone through another internal update. Just like moving into a new home or apartment, designing a new website is an opportunity to de-clutter and focus on only the best stuff. As a website design agency, this is a secondary benefit to our services.

I focus on designing websites for other businesses all the time. So being my own client is an opportunity to assess the approach and process. And ideally make it even better for future clients.

Here are a few things I learned:

Identifying model websites is a MUST.

I always ask my clients to dig up a few designs they really love or specific elements that stand out. The process helps me understand their aesthetic, but it can also be a tool for becoming un-stuck. As I worked on the new Creagent Marketing site, there were times when I was at a loss for how to lay out certain sections. Reviewing other agency sites served as an inspiration. It also provided specific ideas that led me down the right creative path.

Photography is the number one asset.

There was a noticeable difference from the last time I re-designed our website because we had fewer photos to use back then. This time, it was luxurious to be able to dig through several years of pictures. For those businesses who don’t have an extensive library of photos, I suggest budgeting for a photographer as part of a website redesign moving forward. It’s not absolutely necessary, but it makes a huge difference.

One piece of “pillar content” is a great launchpad.

Search engine compatibility and optimization is one of the most important features of any website. An emerging trend is for businesses to generate “content clusters,” or a series of pages and posts around one primary topic. In 2018, I worked on an ebook about travel consumer segments, which became a central piece of content for our new website. In blog and social media posts moving forward, we’ll be able to reference this ebook to increase visitors and leads. This is something I will encourage businesses to attempt in the future. Having a central piece of content helps visitors find and navigate the site. It also establishes a strong, authoritative voice around a specific topic. The benefits are endless.

I enjoyed the opportunity to learn more about my work. This process revealed more tools that can be used for future projects and clients. As always, I look forward to implementing these – and many other – lessons into our upcoming website designs.